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Mending Fences Part II – The RV industry’s parallels to the King Ranch

Mending Fences Part II – The RV industry’s parallels to the King Ranch
Evada and Terry Cooper

By Terry Cooper

ATHENS, Texas — Attending the 2017 RVIA National RV Trade Show Louisville and visiting with the manufacturers and suppliers got me to thinking about the King Ranch in Texas and how similar these two entities are.

For those of you that have never had the privilege of studying Texas history, the King Ranch is the largest ranch in the great state of Texas, a mere 825,000 acres spread over 1,289 square miles and founded in 1853 by Capt. Richard King and Gideon K. Lewis.

The history of the King Ranch reads like one of those magazines at the grocery store checkout stand. A rough and tough lifestyle of economic highs, depressions and then a strong economic recovery. Heck, there was even a gentleman killed for messing around with another man’s wife. We are talking about real soap opera stuff here.

But King Ranch’s real claim to fame is the livestock that was developed through a very selective merging of bloodlines to create a better breed.

The King Ranch had been herding its lanky Longhorns to the railyards to get them to the markets in Chicago and other parts of the country. If you have ever seen one of these Longhorns up close you realize the steaks that would come off this breed would probably be pretty lean and tough as shoe leather. The Longhorn with its huge rack of horns is independent, hard to get along with and pretty much a loner.

The ranch provided an environment that was conducive to creating a carefully crafted mix of Braham and Beef Shorthorn they call the Santa Gertrudis. Bringing these two breeds together created a hearty beef cattle that has ease of calving, excellent mothering skills, can tolerate the South Texas heat and is parasite resistant.

The RV Industry Association provides that same type of environment that is conducive to the merging of brands and products to create an improved product or offering. As I toured the exposition halls, I was looking for other brands and products that would be enhanced by merging of RV Daily Report with their products.

We visited with many folks but there were so many opportunities that we were not able to spend time with everyone.

RV Daily Report and its strategic partners have the ability to tell your story and tell it often. We are looking for your press releases, videos, podcasts and articles to share with others in the RV industry. This, combined with an advertising package that is uniquely crafted toward your business and goals, will merge your products and offerings with the audience of RV Daily Report to generate lasting business opportunities for you.

Reach out to us so we can lean against the bed of the pickup truck, prop our foot up on the rear bumper and discuss how we can present your product or service in a way that will enhance the RV industry.

It is all about building relationships and mending fences. But most of all it’s about asking, “What can I do for you?” RV Daily Report isn’t merely looking for a media buy; we are looking to create relationships that help you achieve your goals as a business and help move the industry forward in a positive way.

Visit us at http://rvdailyreport.com/about-us/advertise-in-rv-daily-report/ to see how we can be of service to you.

 

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About Terry Cooper

Terry Cooper, also known as the Texas RV Professor, is the owner and publisher of RV Daily Report. He is also the president of the National RV Inspectors Association, and the managing director of the National RV Training Academy. He and his wife, Evada, live full-time in an RV and travel the nation teaching technical skills to consumers and professional technicians through the Mobile RV Academy.

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